Meet Your 2017 Writing Goals, Part IV: Set Yourself Up for Success

Welcome back for the fourth (and final) post of my series, (You Can Still!) Meet Your 2017 Writing Goals. 

In my prior posts I wrote about Clearing the Decks for your writing, Reverse-Engineering & Revising Your Writing Goals, and Boosting Your Writing Progress (Or, How to Design a Writing Intensive). Today I’m writing about setting yourself up for success.

Part IV: Setting Yourself Up for Success

When you’re aiming to set yourself up for success with an intensive writing effort, there are a number of things to keep in mind. I discussed some of these in the free clear the decks teleclass (which you can still listen to, if you’re interested), but they are worth reiterating in this context as well, along with some other keys to making your writing work.

  1. Have a Clear Writing Goal and Plan. We’ve already discussed this in prior posts in more detail, but having a crystal clear writing goal and a plan to meet it are a critical part of setting yourself up for success. You can’t “succeed” if you don’t know what you’re trying to accomplish. This is one of those “so simple it seems obvious” things but you’d be amazed at how often we skip this step in our thinking and lives… and our writing.
  2. Manage Your Mindset & Expectations. You will also want manage your mindset when designing for success. This came up on our goal setting call yesterday for the Deep Dive. If we set goals, and don’t meet them, we worry we will then feel disappointed or feel we have “failed.” This can be a deterrent to setting goals in the first place. So you’ll want to be mindful of striking a balance between an inspiring goal that stretches you just outside your comfort zone and is achievable, but doesn’t scare the pants off you, make you want to stop before you even start, or fear feeling wretched if you don’t make it.
  3. Do Your Best Dance. When you embark on an endeavor like this, you will want to give it your very best shot so you can feel proud of yourself at the end, no matter what happens. Play full out and have fun, celebrate the ups and downs as being part of the process, and make sure to get a high-five at the end.
  4. Get Enough Sleep. When you’re a writer, sleep is not a luxury, it’s a requirement. One of the biggest things I work on with writers in my 1:1 coaching sessions is helping them set up a realistic writing schedule that includes getting enough sleep.

    This often means going to bed early enough in order to be able to write early in the morning, or get through a work day and then have the reserves to write in the evening. Sleep has a big impact on your decision making abilities and your fortitude in sticking with your plans, so when you mess with sleep, your resistance is likely to be higher and your commitment to your writing is one of the first things to falter. So make sure you get enough sleep. :) It’s one of the simplest things you can do to support your writing habit.

  5. Make Smart Choices and Eliminate Distractions. In order to free up time for writing (and getting enough sleep), you’ll need to make some super smart choices. You’ll probably have to stop staying up late, surfing the internet, playing Candy Crush, watching Netflix, reading your email, or whatever else you’re doing that eats time.

    You don’t have to stop doing these things, necessarily, but you can turn them into rewards for doing your writing. Just keep them corralled into an appropriate amount of time so you are putting your writing first and reserving the energy you need for writing. Oftentimes we do these things to “recharge” our energy, but it is worth checking in with yourself to see if they are actually recharging, especially past a certain amount of time spent.

  6. Take Care of Your Physical Body. When we write, we’re sitting for long periods of time. We have to take care of our bodies with stretching and exercise. I’m a fan of Pilates and yoga, myself, as well as eating lower carb, especially at lunch time, so I don’t zone out in the afternoons. I also make a point to drink plenty of water and other non-sugar beverages like tea and sparkling water. Think about what keeps you functioning optimally and be sure to put that in place alongside your writing time.
  7. Set Up a Support System and Create Accountability for Yourself. Embarking on a focused writing intensive is highly likely to trigger uncomfortable feelings. You’re taking a big step closer to reaching your overall goal of being a published writer or produced screenwriter, after all. That can trigger a cascade of doubts, fears of success and failure, and resistance. So set up a support system in advance of people you can turn to and lean on for help, if you feel yourself faltering.

    You can also create a system of accountability for yourself. This may be the same support system or it may be different. In my own case, I have outside supporters (friends and writing coaches) who are my support system, and my writing programs for accountability (the Deep Dive and the Circle). The primary distinction for me is that I tend to process challenging emotions with my supporters, while I rely the accountability for helping me stay on track and true to myself with my goals. The important consideration when setting up accountability is to have clearly named your goal and timeline so you feel that sense of internal responsibility to follow through.  

  8. Set Daily Goals to Support Your Overall Goals. While you’re working on meeting your larger writing goals, you’ll want to have broken them down into incremental daily goals too. Do this so you’ll know when you’re done for the day, and if you’re staying on track with meeting your larger goal. During the Deep Dive, we’ll be checking in every morning with our daily writing goals and our writing intentions for the day (see #9).
  9. Set an Intention for Your Writing. Setting yourself up for success includes being intentional about your writing practice, including thinking about the energy you want to bring to your writing each day. When I’m setting my daily writing goal, I like to think about the intention or energy I’ll focus on that day. I usually write it in capital letters somewhere, like PURPOSEFUL or FOCUSED. It helps to bring my attention to my intention when I do it that way.
  10. Reflect on Your Day, Each Day. At the end of the day, notice how it all went. What went well? Where did things go astray? Is there anything you can tweak or adjust for tomorrow? In writing, self-reflection is huge. It’s not about noticing “failures,” it’s about gathering information and learning and improving … and having fun with piecing together a puzzle that works. 
  11. Reward Yourself. Plan in advance how you’ll reward yourself at the end of your hard work, each day, each week, and at the end of your writing intensive. Is there a great treat you’ll reward yourself with? Something you wouldn’t normally give yourself? This might be just the right time to get it. :) 

Got questions?

Leave them in the comments and I’ll be happy to answer. 

And check out Part I, here: Clearing the Decks, Part II, here: Reverse Engineer and Revise Your Goals, and Part III, here: Boost Your Writing Progress (Or, How to Design a Writing Intensive).

 

Make Massive Progress on Your Book (or Script!)

The upcoming two-week Deep Dive Writing Intensive starts on Wednesday, September 20th and the last day to join us is Tuesday, September 19th. Join us and get tons of support and accountability to make deep progress on your book or script. Find out more and register here

 

Meet Your 2017 Writing Goals, Part III: Boost Your Writing Progress (Or, How to Design a Writing Intensive)

Welcome back for the third part of my series, (You Can Still!) Meet Your 2017 Writing Goals. 

In last week’s posts I wrote about Clearing the Decks for your writing and Reverse-Engineering & Revising Your Writing Goals. Today I’m writing about boosting your progress. Next time I’ll talk about Setting Yourself Up for Success, so stay tuned for that posts, coming up soon.

Part III: Boost Your Writing Progress — Or, Design a Writing Intensive

In my last post, I wrote about reverse engineering and revising your goals. The reason to assess your 2017 writing goals now is that we’re within spitting distance of the end of the calendar year, and therefore the “deadline” for meeting 2017 goals …before the clock strikes midnight. 

Even if you’ve decided to shift your goals forward into 2018 (I’ve done this with one of my writing goals), you may still want to do an extra “push” with your writing this year to boost your progress and move the ball down the field a little farther than you might get if you a) aren’t writing as much as you’d like to, b) are catching up after a summer writing hiatus or slow-down, c) still want to try to meet your original goal, or d) need a leg up with your motivation.

Doing a focused burst of writing — a short-term writing intensive — is like doing a runner’s wind sprint, where you alternate slower, steadier walking or slow running with more intense bursts of faster running. So doing a writing intensive is about temporarily picking up your pace, then downshifting back into your regular writing habit. (You have a regular writing habit, right? If you don’t, check out my Circle for help.)

A focused stretch of writing can also serve another purpose: It allows you to go deeper into your writing. It’s about putting the focus more intently on your writing. It’s not just about writing faster or more — but it’s also about a quality of experience. Almost like carving out an at-home, immersive writing retreat for yourself. 

In the Deep Dive writing intensive I’m running (starting next week), we’re creating this deeper experience by “clearing the decks” — making space for focused, daily writing at a more intense level by eliminating obstacles and distractions. One of the things I talked about during the free clear the decks teleclass (which you can still listen to, if you’re interested), is mentally making space for your writing, including thinking about what you’re reading, watching, and thinking about during your writing intensive. 

Set Up a Writing Intensive for Yourself

Here’s a simple strategy for creating a writing intensive for yourself:

  1. Give yourself a clear time period within which you’ll complete your intensive, whether it’s a day, weekend, week, or month.
  2. Clear the decks for your writing. Eliminate distractions, set up your life so you can focus on your writing.
  3. Get crystal clear on your writing goal for your intensive.
  4. Have a plan for how you’ll complete your writing goal (more on this below).
  5. Implement your writing plan, hour-by-hour, day-by-day, step-by-step, task-by-task.
  6. Have a reward in mind you’ll receive when you finish.

Have a Plan to Meet Your Writing Goal

When you’re aiming to write efficiently, wind sprint style, you’ll make more of your writing time if you go into it knowing exactly what you’re working on. Sometimes writing is unwieldy at best, but you can still go into it with a clear intention and plan. 

The type of plan you develop will depend on where you are with your current book or script.

Here are samples of plans you could create for your writing intensive. The idea with all these plans is to give you a clear list of tasks to work through, one by one, so you can stay focused and efficient during your intensive rather than feeling overwhelmed, spinning in circles, or getting lost along the way.

  1. Story Development Intensive. If you’re developing a new story, you can create a list of items you want to have answered before you start writing, so you can be crystal clear on your work plan (and so you’ll know when you’re done!). For example, you may want to have your plot points identified, your premise line written, your character profiles developed, and a scene-by-scene outline created, among other things. Here’s my “Must Have” list before writing pages.
  2. New Writing Intensive. If you’re ready to start writing pages, you’ll hopefully already have your own list of story development items complete and ready to go so you can just jump straight into writing pages. If you don’t yet have your story developed, you could go back to the Story Development Intensive, and make your writing intensive about doing that work, or perhaps you prefer to just go for the “pantser” approach and write an intuitive stream-of-consciousness draft. That’s a perfectly reasonable approach, and many writers swear by it. I would be remiss in not saying, though, that it can create one of the biggest challenges I see for writers who then have a potentially massive, disjointed draft they then have to face revising and editing.
  3. Organization Intensive. Perhaps you’re at a different stage of work — the organization stage. Many writers spend years drafting various versions and pieces of a manuscript and then find themselves overwhelmed with all the parts and sections. If you’re in this boat, you’ll want to make a plan for how you’ll address getting it organized. I recommend you start by cataloguing what you have and where it’s located, along with a single sentence summarizing each section. While you’re at it, you may want to develop a numbering or naming scheme for your digital and paper files. Once you know where everything is, and what it is, you can move into developing a plan for adding additional writing or moving into the revision stage if you have everything you need (writing additional scenes or chapters can be a natural part of a revision plan, after all). Organizing is a great thing to tackle in an intensive because it’s one of those onerous tasks often best handled in a big burst of work.
  4. Story Analysis Intensive. If you’re at the stage where you have a draft, but you’re not ready to begin revising because you know your story needs more in-depth work, you may want to check out Shawn Coyne’s The Story Grid: What Good Editors Know * as a process for analyzing your work. Tackling this level of work could potentially become the entirety of what you do for a writing intensive, depending on how much time you have set aside, or it could be the first stages of a revision intensive.
  5. Revision Intensive. If you’re revising, I strongly recommend having a revision plan in place before you begin. You could use a Story Grid plan, or use a different approach. I’m a fan of Rachel Aaron’s revision approach in her book 2k to 10k: Writing Faster, Writing Better, and Writing More of What You Love,* where she has you make a to-do list, a reverse outline, and a timeline for your story so you can more efficiently dip in and out of your story to make corrections and revisions. It’s also worth prioritizing your to-do list from largest to smallest changes, so you’re not undoing work if you suddenly cut a large swath of text.  
  6. Polishing Intensive. If you’re at the final stage, you can do a polishing intensive to spine and proofread your final draft. This may involve first doing a pass through the manuscript to make small changes throughout the text, then printing and proofreading the draft, then making the changes in the final version.

In my own case, I’m currently working on revising pages for the screenplay I’m working on. Since it’s a fairly major revision, the steps I’ve taken to get to this stage include:

  • Meeting with the producer I’m working with and getting his feedback and notes on the prior draft.
  • Summarizing our notes so I could see what needed to be changed and what would stay the same.
  • Reverse outlining the prior draft.
  • Reworking the GMC for the characters.
  • Reworking my Story Grid Foolscap for the overall story (and all of the many things that entails).
  • Reworking the plot points and handling the ripple-effect changes they created.
  • Creating a new scene-by-scene outline for the story, including a scene event, goal, motivation, and conflict for each scene. 
  • Collecting all the scenes from the prior draft that are rework-able and adding them into my new draft in Scrivener.
  • Starting to rewrite those existing scenes and write new scenes as I move through the script — and this is what I’ll be continuing to do before and during the Deep Dive.

Got questions? Comments?

Leave them in the comments and I’ll be happy to respond. :) 

And check out Part I, here: Clearing the Decks, Part II, here: Reverse Engineer and Revise Your Goals, and Part IV, here: Setting Yourself Up For Success.

 

Make Massive Progress on Your Book (or Script!)

The upcoming two-week Deep Dive Writing Intensive starts on Wednesday, September 20th and the last day to join us is Tuesday, September 19th. Join us and get tons of support and accountability to make deep progress on your book or script. Find out more and register here

 

* Amazon affiliate link

Meet Your 2017 Writing Goals, Part II: Reverse Engineer and Revise Your Goals

Welcome back to the second part of my series, (You Can Still!) Meet Your 2017 Writing Goals. 

In Tuesday’s post I wrote about Clearing the Decks for your writing. Today I’m writing about reverse engineering and revising (if needed) your writing goals. Next up we’ll talk about Boosting Your Progress and Setting Yourself Up for Success so stay tuned for those posts, coming over the next several days.

Part II: Reverse-Engineer and Revise Your Writing Goals

The first thing you’ll want to do, when it comes to meeting your writing goals for 2017, is to remind yourself of what exactly your writing goals for this year are. Hopefully at or near the beginning of the year you sat down and wrote out your writing goals. Go find them and see what they say. For real. I’ll wait. :) 

If you’re already on track, great! 

If not, here’s where we come to the reverse engineering and revising part.

Often times goal setting involves a LOT of magical thinking, as I wrote about last time. At the beginning of the year, it’s easy to be romantic about what’s possible. Then unexpected things happen and it’s time now to get really realistic about what’s possible. So you have some choices to make.

First, think about whether you can still meet your writing goals as they stand.

There are now 78 working days left in this calendar year (including today)(69 for those of us with kids home for winter break). If you do the math on what you were intending to accomplish, is that realistic and doable?

For example, if you had intended to revise the remaining 60,000 words left in your 120,000 word book, that means revising about 800 words a day. That’s moderately reasonable, right? Of course there are variables, like the depth of revision you need to do, too, so you’ll have to mentally make accommodation for that.

On the other hand, if you were wanting to finish a draft of a brand new 80,000 word book, that means writing 1,025 words per day. Also fairly reasonable. 

This is great news, right?

But it also means getting pretty serious about meeting those daily goals. Like now, so you don’t end up binge writing and burning out or giving up in despair as December 31 rolls around. 

And, there are additional variables, like what you’re specifically working on, your writing pace, available time, if you want to write on weekends, or can’t write on weekdays.

For example, with revision, there are what I’ve come to call “black hole” chapters, thanks to one of my Circle members. These are the chapters where once you get into it, it’s not just a matter of light editing, but reworking the content in such a way that it requires scrapping it and rewriting it entirely and/or has a ripple effect throughout the entire book. So maybe you’ve just revised the 2,000 words in the chapter, but it took you five extra days to re-plot it and then rewrite it, and it also means that you now have more work to do throughout the whole book. Such is the nature of revision.

So realistically, let’s say this means you can really only revise the equivalent of 400 words per day, on average. That doubles the amount of time to complete the revision, putting you well into next year. Are you okay with that?

If yes, great!

If not, revise your goal to a new more accurate date. But then also create a daily writing plan that reflects this new daily goal of 400 words per day. 

(And just to be clear, I know “revising” 400 words per day is something of a misnomer, because sometimes we end up cutting 400 words and then we’re at zero! But I think you can combine both a time goal, e.g. 60 to 120 minutes per day of revising plus working through 400 existing words in your manuscript as a way of handling it.)

Second, if you can’t meet your original goal upon analysis, you have choices.

  1. As I mentioned above, you can revise your goal to a new target date next year.
  2. Or, you may want to revise your 2017 goals to reflect changes that have come up this year and let go of your original goals, and decide on new goals for this year that feel more doable, like getting to a specific milestone in your draft. For example, to the end of a specific section or chapter.
  3. Or, you can design a brief writing “push,” or intensive burst of writing, to move you closer to your goal more quickly, to help you pick up your pace and increase your chances of meeting your original goal. This is part of what we’re doing in the Deep Dive writing intensive. You can also do this on your own.
  4. Or, you may want to both revise your goal and do a push to meet it. It’s up to you!

Your choice will depend on a number of things.

  • Do you have a hard deadline you have to meet?
  • Will you be terribly disappointed if you don’t meet your original goal?
  • Is it worth it to you to make an extra push with your writing so you can meet your goal this year? 
  • Is doing a push possible for you right now? Is it worth the extra energy required?
  • Is your goal more complex than I’ve used in the examples above? For example, maybe you not only wanted to write the 80,000 word book but you also wanted to edit and self-publish it, which may not be realistic at this point.
  • Are you dealing with other life challenges you need to factor in? 
  • Has your writing situation changed, perhaps because of new writing agreements or contracts?

Third, once you’ve made a choice, revise your goal, if needed, and then map out a plan to help you meet it.

I like to use SMART goal setting, which I’ll be reviewing with my Deep Dive participants in our Goal Setting Call next Wednesday. Here’s the overview:

  • Specific (What are you working on?)
  • Measurable (How much are you aiming to accomplish in terms of words, time, or pages?)
  • Achievable (How and when will you do it? Is it doable?)
  • Resonant (Why are you doing it? Why now, and is it in alignment with the Big Why behind why you’re working on this project?)
  • Time Bound (By when will you accomplish this goal?)

And here’s my example:

  • Specific/What: Screenplay
  • Measurable/How much: 70 pages of new writing and rewriting, approximately 5 pages per day in the 14 days of the Deep Dive.
  • Achievable/How and when: Approximately 2 hours per day in the mornings, and yes, doable — I can usually write about 2.5 screenplay pages in an hour.
  • Resonant/Why: To submit to the producer I’m working with, Big Why: To tell a story I’m passionate about — the tale of a boy building a relationship with his father in a post-apocalyptic world.  
  • Time Bound/By when: By October 4th when we finish the Deep Dive. 

Doing this work, while sometimes a bit annoying :), helps you get realistic about what you can and want to accomplish and help boost your motivation and energy for achieving it.

Got questions?

Leave them in the comments and I’ll be happy to answer. :) 

And check out Part I, here: Clearing the Decks, Part III, here: Boost Your Writing Progress (Or, How to Design a Writing Intensive), and Part IV, here: Setting Yourself Up For Success.

 

Make Massive Progress on Your Book (or Script!)

The upcoming two-week Deep Dive Writing Intensive starts on Wednesday, September 20th and the last day to join us is Tuesday, September 19th. Join us and get tons of support and accountability to make deep progress on your book or script. Find out more and register here

 

 

Meet Your 2017 Writing Goals, Part I: Clearing the Decks (and a Free TeleClass!)

It’s back-to-school time. For many of us, regardless of whether we have kids or are going to school ourselves, this means we’re both recovering from summertime and tuning into the back-to-school fall energy. Which is usually highly motivating and exciting. 

It also means we’ve hit that moment where the end of the year is in sight.

If you take the time to think about it, this is the ideal come-to-Jesus moment for meeting your writing goals for 2017 — far better now than to try to pull out all the stops on December 15th. Maybe you didn’t get as much writing done this summer (or year so far) as you’d intended. Maybe you did. If you’re on track, more power to you! If not, this is a great time to adjust your course.

Goal setting at the beginning of the year is often a magical, inspired effort. And by magical, I mean, magical thinking. Somehow, in the thick of the holidays and year’s end, it seems as if the year ahead will not be filled with… anything! We’ll miraculously have oodles of time. We declare that we’ll finally focus and achieve things we haven’t achieved before. And then January happens. Then February. And March. And suddenly it’s end of summer and we feel like we have whiplash looking back trying to figure out where the time has gone.

I know I was unexpectedly affected by illnesses for much of the winter and spring, various challenges with my parents’ health, as well as all of the political happenings. I didn’t have space built into my writing plans for any of those things. I haven’t stopped writing, but I certainly haven’t been as efficient as I’d intended. I’m okay with that. Life happens. But I also still want to make a solid stab at reaching my goals for 2017.

My Deep Dive writing intensive is a big part of this plan for me. I’m looking forward to making a big boost of progress on the sci-fi script I’m working on to help me jump start a broader push through the end of the year. I’m also looking ahead, knowing the holidays are coming, along with my birthday, and my older son’s birthday (10!), plus flu and cold season, so I’m aiming to take action while the energy is here. 

Here’s where I’m starting the process. I’m writing this “(You Can Still!) Meet Your 2017 Writing Goals” series to help all of us bring awareness to the fact that the year end is a heck of a lot closer than we think. (There are 80 working days between today and the end of the year, and that doesn’t factor in winter break vacations for those of us with kids.)

Today, we’ll talk about Clearing the Decks to help you meet your writing goals.

In the next three posts we’ll cover Revising Your Goals, Boosting Your Progress, and Setting Yourself Up For Success

Part I: Clear the Decks for Your Writing

Clearing the decks for writing is a fascinating topic because it can be such a slippery slope — I don’t want anyone to decide they have to KonMari* their entire home before they can write — so it’s worth being mindful about how you approach this.

At the same time, when I’m looking at doing a two week stint of intensely focused writing, I know I’m going to have to make some extra space in my life to accommodate that. So I want to look to see, are there places in my life I can streamline, clean up, delegate, and clear out to make more room for my writing (and for me!)?

This is also a great time review any schedule creep that’s occurred — in other words, have I taken on any extra commitments that I perhaps should postpone or eliminate? Have I back-slid on scheduling my writing time or my resolve to meet it? 

I recently led a free teleclass to go over all this in detail. (It was be recorded so you can still listen to the recording.) If you’d like to listen, click here to join my mailing list and get the recording details.

Here’s a preview of some of what we’ll be talking about — I’ll be sharing tips about each of these as well:

  1. Logistically: What adjustments do you need to make to your schedule to make space for your writing? What events, guests, responsibilities, and commitments do you have coming up that you’ll either want to reschedule or decide how to accommodate around your writing? 
  2. Physically: What do you need to do to make your physical space more conducive to writing, if anything? Is there clutter? Are there distractions in your line of sight? How can you take great care of your physical needs with healthy food, snacks, beverages, sleep, and exercise? 
  3. Mentally: How will you reward yourself for writing? Are there any open loops you need to close or resolve so you can focus? How will you handle new writing ideas that may come up during your writing time? How will you handle negative self-thoughts if they come up?
  4. Emotionally: How will you handle emotional challenges that may arise around your writing? How will you handle non-writing emotional challenges? What support systems can you put in place?
  5. Digitally: How can you minimize or eliminate digital distractions so you can focus on your writing?
  6. Financially: What bill paying and other financial tasks can you handle now or automate so you can prioritize your writing? 
  7. Relationally: How can you guide your family, partners, friends, and colleagues to respect your writing time? 
  8. Spiritually: How can you spiritually prepare to make the most of your writing time? What intentions and positive visions are you holding for yourself as you write?


Click here to get the free Clear the Decks teleclass recording.

 

And check out Part II, here: Reverse Engineer and Revise Your Goals, Part III, here: Boost Your Writing Progress (Or, How to Design a Writing Intensive), and Part IV, here: Setting Yourself Up For Success.

 

Make Massive Progress on Your Book (or Script!)

The upcoming two-week Deep Dive Writing Intensive starts on Wednesday, September 20th and the last day to join us is Tuesday, September 19th. Join us and get tons of support and accountability to make deep progress on your book or script. Find out more and register here

 

* The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Photo by Ales Krivec on Unsplash

 

Free teleclass: Setting Motivating Writing Goals & Intentions

The fourth and final class in my free Master Your Creative Productivity series was last night and the recording is now available! 

If you missed the series, you can still sign up to get the recordings, which will only be available for another week, through Friday, April 8. You’ll get instant access to the recording archives when you register.

Here’s what we’ve covered in the class series:

Part I: Powerful Tools to Help You Write Productively

  • Defining what being productive means.
  • 3 writing productivity principles.
  • 5 time principles to help you be more effective with EVERYTHING you do.
  • 7 writing productivity power tools you can put to use right away.

Part II: The Anti-Creativity Cycle and How to Break It

  • Defining perfectionism and 5 thoughts about the role perfectionism plays in our writing lives.
  • The Anti-Creativity Cycle of perfectionism, procrastination, and paralysis and a laundry list of ways it shows up.
  • Other creative blocks and obstacles like impostor syndrome, fear of success and fear of failure, and more.
  • 15 solutions and antidotes for the Anti-Creativity Cycle and other creative blocks.

Part III: Keeping Your Creative Energy Vibrant for Optimal Writing Productivity

  • The trick to managing the emotional ups and downs of a long-form writing project.
  • Simple but important ways to take care of your physical body AND your creative mind.
  • 3 energy boosting strategies.
  • 3 nifty techniques to balance and recharge your energy.
  • 5 creative recovery skills for whenever (or if ever!) you get off track.

Part IV: Setting Motivating Writing Goals & Intentions

  • 5 ways to set yourself up for success with your goals in advance.
  • Smart goal setting that works.
  • Reverse engineering your writing timelines.
  • The power of a plan for revisions.
  • Using intentions to supercharge your writing sessions.
  • How to set motivating rewards and celebrations.
  • BONUS: Managing distractions.

I’ve been getting terrific feedback from the writers who have participated and I’d love to have you take advantage of this opportunity too. You’ll find that the series is packed with practical tools and strategies you can put into place right away to help you boost your productivity as a writer.

 

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Reverse Engineer Your 2016 Writing Goals

We’re closing in on the end of the first month of the year. I can’t quite believe it!

Most of us started off the year with solid intentions to write. How’s that going for you?

If you’re writing less than you’d like to be, this is the perfect time to make a course correction.

In fact, in some ways, it’s the BEST time to make a course correction, because we’re early enough in the year that small adjustments will go far.

So dig out your end of 2016 writing goals and take stock. (And if you haven’t created your 2016 writing goals yet, here’s a great tool to help you — and no, it’s definitely NOT too late!)

Do the Math

If you haven’t done this yet, reverse engineer your goals so you can see where you’re wanting to be by the end of the month (and at any point along your projected timeline).

Example 1: Finish an 80,000 word novel by December 31.

For example, if you’re aiming to complete an 80,000 word novel by the end of the year, you can figure out your approximate daily word counts. The math for this tells us that you’ll want to be writing about 320 words per day, 5 days per week, all year, excluding holidays (there are 251 working days in 2016).

This means that by January 31, you’ll want to have completed approximately 6,080 words (19 working days in January). This assumes that you’re either writing by the seat of your pants (a “pantser”) or that you’ve already plotted the novel. It also assumes that you work on weekdays and take holidays and weekends off.

Example 2: Plot AND finish an 80,000 word novel by December 31.

Another example: If your goal is to complete an 80,000 word novel by the end of the year, but you haven’t plotted it yet, you can set a timeline for the plotting and the writing. You might allow two weeks or two months to plot; it’s up to you, your writing process, and your available time.

But once you know your timeline, you can break down the plotting into increments, such as chapters or plot points that you want to hit by a certain date. Then you can assess your progress.

Let’s say you’re aiming for two months for plotting, and we’re nearing the end of January right now. So you should be halfway through the plotting at this point, or ideally around the midpoint of your novel. Then, starting in March, you’ll have 212 working days left to write those 80,000 words, or about 377 words per day.

Tools and Adjustments

I love spreadsheets for this kind of calculating and planning. (In fact, I’m working on making a special one for you right now — stay tuned for that!)

Of course you can adjust these calculations for your project and schedule, such as if you prefer to write on weekends, for instance.

Or as in my case, if you’re writing screenplays, you might want to set a daily target page count rather than a word count.

Also, be aware that these calculations don’t include revision or editing time, which may not always lend themselves to a linear progression since deeper cuts and reworking tends to work better from a to do list method.

Assess Your Progress

Once you’ve reverse-engineered your goals, check in: Are you on track to meet your goals by the end of the year? Do you need to bump up your daily word counts or adjust your time table?

One of the smartest things I see writers do is get crystal clear on the math of their projects so they know exactly what to aim for and can pace themselves well. It’s all too easy to live in fantasy land, unclear on what you’re trying to accomplish, floundering in hope and optimism rather than grounded, practical reality. 

So check in on where you’re supposed to be, and make an assessment of what — if any — adjustments you need to make, and you’ll be good to go. 

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Need support to meet those goals? 

Coaching CircleMy Called to Write Coaching Circle will give you support, accountability, and more encouragement than you can shake a stick at to write on a regular basis and make sure you’re finishing all your writing projects.

If you’d like to join us in February, sign up no later than TOMORROW, Thursday, January 28th at Midnight Pacific Time here: http://JustDoTheWriting.com.

We can’t wait to write with you!

Make 2015 your year to write, Part seven (and last day for 2014 rates!)

It’s that time, writers — we’ve come to the last installment of our Make 2015 Your Year to Write series. I hope you’ve found it both practical and inspiring.

Today, in many ways, is the most important one of the series, so kudos to you for sticking with me thus far.

Over the last six days, we’ve looked at where you’ve been with your writing life, what your challenges are, what you want from your writing life, and what you need and want in both the big picture and the coming year, it’s time to talk about how to make it all happen.

And remember, if you have questions, thoughts, challenges, comments, or problems, I’m your coach for one more day! Just post them in the comments section on the blog and I’ll be sure to address or answer them for you.  

Let’s go for part seven!!

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Make your writing happen

You’ve done an amazing piece of work this week. You know what your goals are. You know what you want from your writing career and your writing life. You know what your trouble spots are.

Now what?

This, my fine writing friends, this is where the rubber hits the road.

It’s all well and good to name your goals, but you’ve got to have a plan to make them happen.

Let’s talk about how you can do that.

How to meet your writing goals in 2015

Luckily we’ve avoided having you create pie-in-the-sky goals with our work together. And we’ve made sure they are actually in alignment with the big picture of what you want.

But even so, there’s still so much working against you that you have to have several key ingredients in place to help you overcome the resistance, fear, doubt, and procrastination that will rear up repeatedly like that monster you only thought you killed at the end of Act Two.

Here are some of the most powerful means you can have at your disposal to help you keep on writing even in the face of such horrors. 

  • A life decision to actually write. If you are going to be a writer, if you’re really serious about it, you need to make up your mind right now that you will write no matter what. No more being a dilettante. No more waffling. No more excuses. No more dreaming without doing.
  • A bone fide, for real, no B.S., daily writing habit. Wanting to write is grand. ACTUALLY writing is grander. When you write daily or near daily, you will BE a writer. Getting there is not so easy. There are so many things that get in the way, as we’ve seen. Doubts, excuses, fear, resistance, perfectionism, LIFE. It’s tough. And most of us think that we just need to resolve to write, or be more disciplined, or schedule it. But those things aren’t enough by themselves. What you really need is a habit. A solid daily writing habit that means that even if everything goes sideways on you, you’ll still be thinking, “Okay, wow, I still gotta write today, when am I gonna do that?”, followed by quickly moving mountains to make it so. You want a writing habit that is so immutable that there’s never even a question of IF you are going to write, only rarely a question of WHEN, and in fact it’s something you just DO, like brushing your teeth or putting clothes on before you go outside. Something you wouldn’t even think of NOT doing.
  • An inner knowing on when to “call it” on craft training. Yes, sometimes we need a little more training to do our best work. But I also know far too many writers who just endlessly take classes. We also have to be writing. Don’t be one of those writers who keeps getting more and more training instead of facing the blank page. Sure, a class here and there. But don’t keep going back to college for another degree instead of doing the work.
  • A writing schedule. Putting writing on your calendar is a huge step toward making your writing happen. It’s an acknowledgment of the fact that you’ll have to make choices to write, choices that will mean giving up other things, and being okay with that. It’s a visual reminder that you’re committed to writing, and carving out time to do so. Keep in mind, however, that a schedule is only a tool. You still have to show up and do the writing.
  • Massive amounts of accountability. When you’re serious about writing, you’ll want to have accountability in place to help you make it happen. Unless you are enormously and entirely self-motivated and never go astray from your path, you need accountability — as much of as needed for you to stay 100% on track on a daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly basis. My small group coaching program, the Writer’s Circle, includes a daily accountability system for writers. Other kinds of accountability include writer’s groups, mentors, deadlines, accountability parties, and writing buddies. Again, put as much of it in place as you need to write with a sense of purpose and intent. And then add a little more for good measure.
  • Support to get back on track if or when you fall off course. Writing is a lonely business. Get support for the dark days. We ALL face them, including me. Surround yourself with positive, supportive writers who will help you through the painful critiques, the negative reviews, and the days when you can’t write a note to your kids about cleaning their rooms let alone face your novel.
  • Compassionate self-understanding. Writing is a tough gig. There will be days when you hate it. There will also be days that you LOVE it. But on the bad days, your inner critic is going to bat sh*t crazy on you and you cannot allow yourself to fall for it. It’s a critically important skill to learn to combat your inner critic and keep on writing. This is something we do daily in the Writer’s Circle.
  • Clear specific goals and projects. We’ve done a lot of work around goals this week, so I’m not going to add a lot here except to say this: Don’t try to work on multiple projects at once unless you are a pro. If you’re a newer writer, working on multiple projects at once is usually a death knell for all of them. Oftentimes writers will hop between projects when one gets too hard, but then struggle with discouragement over the lack of progress on any of them. My advice? Pick one and stick with it until it’s done, even if it’s hard and even if you hate it temporarily, at least to the point of a major milestone. If you finish a solid draft and move on to a new project to let the first one breathe, fine. But don’t “layer” projects unless you are 100% capable of navigating between and finishing them.
  • A milestone plan for each and every project. I mentioned this yesterday too. Create a timeline for each writing project so you know where all the major milestones are and you know what you have to do to complete them. Don’t just strike off in an “I’m just going to write every day” vague way. Know what you’re trying to accomplish on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis so you can hit that yearly goal without binge-writing at the end or giving up in apathy and frustration part way through the year.

Hold these in mind as we go on to today’s writing prompts:

1. What will you do to making your writing goals happen in 2015?

Think about what you will do to meet your writing goals. Be as specific as you can.

From Ginger, a Writer’s Circle member:

“2015 for me is really about prolificacy. I’ve spent a lot of years sitting around plotting and planning and organizing and envisioning and figuring and sorting and assessing and weighing. That’s lovely and all, but there’s a point at which you must say to yourself, ‘Well done. Now get to work.’

“For me, 2015 is going to be about multiple times a day writing, about learning to write in suboptimal circumstances, and finding creative ways around predictable blocks. Yes, I prefer to write in longer chunks – not necessarily hours at a stretch, which is too much for me, but more than 30 minutes. I would also prefer to live at Disney World. So this year I’m going to embrace small chunks. Five minutes here, 300 words there.”

From my notebook:

“No more classes. Since I want to focus on my own writing and on my precious time with our new son, I need to keep the extracurricular activities to a minimum. This means having a clear plan and timeline for each of my projects, and a quiet, contained schedule within which to meet the necessary milestones. 2015 for me feels like a time to hunker down and focus on what’s most important to me, rather than trying to do it all.”

 

2. What actions will you take?

Then give some thought to any specific actions you need to take.

From Ginger:

“I haven’t completely decided yet – that’s part of what the Writer’s Circle is for – but part of it is going to be about checklists. Little reminders. Maybe a timer on my phone saying ‘write for three minutes’ or ‘write 100 words’.

“I suppose the biggest action I will take – and this is truly revolutionary for me – is trying different things. I will take small steps, rather than planning big steps.”

From my notebook:

“I’m going to create a clear schedule laid out in a format I can easily follow and adjust — on a large wall calendar. And I’ll keep reminding myself not to sign up for any more classes until 2016. :)”

 

3. What kind of support will you put in place?

Now think about what kind of support (and accountability) you need to make it happen.

If you’re the kind of writer who starts out with the best intentions but then falls short of her goals, you’ll want to give careful thought to this question. Oftentimes quality accountability and support are the critical variables that make the difference between “dreamed of” and “DONE”.

From Helen, a Writer’s Circle member:

“I plan to continue with the Writer’s Circle until I finish the dissertation. The support is helping to propel my movement forward, and to counteract the negative criticism that I get in my regular life. I plan to ignore and/or mitigate the negative feedback, and to absorb more of the supportive and positive encouragement.”

From Ginger:

“The Writer’s Circle is really helpful for this because before, I would sort of flounder around saying, ‘I don’t know how to solve this.’ I would spend all my time thinking about the problem and precious little looking for a solution. When you look up ‘Reinventing The Wheel’ in the dictionary, you’ll see my face. But the Writer’s Circle helps because I know that all I have to do is mention the problem in passing and I’m going to have a half dozen people who have already solved this problem giving me support. So that’s helpful. So I guess what I need to do this year is actually use the support. Sometimes I feel like one of those people who doesn’t go to Weight Watchers until they’ve lost weight, or doesn’t call a cleaning lady because their house isn’t clean.

I guess this year is about using the support structure, even if my writing is feeling fat and dirty.

 

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pen coffeeWriting prompts for Part seven: Make it happen

Here are your writing prompts for today. If you’re inspired to do so, please share your responses in the comments section on the blog (and feel free to leave questions for me too, if you have them). Otherwise you can take them to your journal, talk them over with your writing colleagues, or just contemplate them when you can. 

  • What will you do to making your writing goals happen in 2015?
  • What actions will you take?
  • What kind of support will you put in place?

Thank you so much for writing along with me this week, and may 2015 be filled with joyous writing and many blessings.

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Reminder: Last day for 2014 rates

Join the Writer's CircleBefore you head off to your journal, I have an important reminder about my Writer’s Circle small group coaching program.

We’re extending our 2014 rates through Midnight Pacific Time TONIGHT so you can lock in the subscription rate you select and save 30 to 50%, depending on the subscription package you choose.

The Writer’s Circle small group coaching program will help you show up, get your butt in the chair, write, and see your projects all the way through to FINISHED.

The next session starts this coming Monday, January 5. It’s the perfect time to build the professional writing habit you really need to meet your writing goals for 2015 and make this your writing year to remember.

Registration closes TONIGHT, Friday, January 2nd at Midnight Pacific Time.

Find out more and register online at www.JustDoTheWriting.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make 2015 your year to write, Part six (plus, an important reminder!)

Happy New Year’s Day, writers! And welcome back to the Make 2015 Your Year to Write series. 

We’re deep into it now — and closing in on the end of our seven-part series! You’ve done so much work so far, first by reflecting on your writing life so far, then in part two looking at your writing patterns and challenges, and in part three tapping into what you want for your writing life. We went on in part four to explore how to close the gap between where you are right now and where you want to end up, and in part five, we looked at your big picture vision for your writing career as a whole. 

Now that we’ve built that solid foundation, it’s time to look at what you want to achieve in 2015.

Even if you’ve already set your goals for the year, I’m going to invite you to use this process to help you refine them.

A quick note to those of you just joining us: It’s perfectly okay to dive in now. The writing prompts for each piece are simple and only take a few minutes each, though you could certainly do more if you felt inspired. I imagine you sitting today, in a quiet moment, writing in your journal (or here on the blog if you’re inspired to share) and contemplating your writing and your writing life for 2015.

Remember, if you have questions, thoughts, challenges, comments, or problems, I’ll be your coach. Just post them in the comments section on the blog and I’ll be sure to address or answer them for you. 

Let’s jump in to part six.

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Set goals for your writing year

Let’s talk about the difference between goals and resolutions. 

  • goal as something that we want to achieve — it has a specific desired result.
  • resolution as a decision to do or not to do something. That resolution may also produce a result, but it may also be about a way of being or thinking as well. Resolutions can also encompass the how of our means of getting to our desired results or goals.

Both goals and resolutions are worth setting.

However.

also believe it is important to set real, attainable goals and resolutions rather than creating unrealistic scenarios that are impossible to achieve. 

The reason for this is that when you make promises to yourself that you can’t keep, you break trust with yourself. And when you can’t trust yourself, it’s hard to make anything happen or believe in your abilities when the going gets tough. And it will.

I’m seeing writers all over Facebook right now posting unrealistic goals. And honestly, it makes me feel a bit sad.

I’d much rather see you set a goal you KNOW you can accomplish than aim for something that just makes you feel bad and deters you from trying again.

That is NOT a good way to accomplish ANYTHING.

Let’s look at how to set effective goals and resolutions, and then you’ll work on your own with the writing prompts for today.

How to set goals

As you’re working through this part of the process, make a point to keep in mind everything you’ve learned this week about your progress, process, challenges, changes, and visions as you set your goals and resolutions. Make sure they match up well. It’s a good time to review your answers to the writing prompts from the prior days in the series so you can integrate them into your planning.

For instance, if you know you have an intense year coming up, keep your goals simple. Or if you know you have a hard time actually showing up to do the work, make your goals small enough that they don’t overwhelm you. Or if you’ve been holding back from what you know you’re truly capable of, see if you can raise the bar a little higher.

Here are the links again, for ease of reference:

SMART goals 

When it comes to goal setting, I’m a fan of setting SMART goals. Lots of people roll their eyes at the method, but don’t worry, you don’t have go all googly-eyed over it. Just use it as a quick check to make sure that your goal actually makes sense. It doesn’t have to be fancier than that.

SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Resonant, and Time-Bound. 

  • Specific means that you are clear about what you are working on.
  • Measurable means that it is measurable in some way, whether through a number of minutes, words, or pages. 
  • Attainable means that you can reasonably accomplish it.
  • Resonant means that it feels like the right thing to be working on.
  • Time-Bound means that there is a clear ending deadline for its completion.

Here’s an example:

Finish my current sci-fi screenplay by January 31.

  • Specific: Yes – my current sci-fi screenplay
  • Measurable: Yes – about 90 pages for the rough draft 
  • Attainable: Yes – if I write 2-3 pages a day for 31 days, I’ll finish on that schedule. And since I have about 60 minutes to write each day, and I can write about 2-3 pages in an hour (sometimes more), that will be attainable.
  • Resonant: Yes – it’s the project I’m most interested in working on and finishing next.
  • Time-Bound: Yes – the end of January

These kinds of SMART goals are useful because they help you get and stay clear about the What, How Much, and By When that are so helpful for keeping on track.

Here are a few more examples of SMART goals:

  • Write two new screenplays by December 31.
  • Write a new novel by December 31.
  • Outline my new novel by January 31.
  • Publish an ebook by April 15.
  • Revise and publish my two draft novels by December 31.

Other tips about setting goals

  • Be as specific as you can. Know what project you’re going to work on if possible. Get specific about the numbers you’re talking about, like numbers of pages and words for the project in its entirety. 
  • Reverse engineer your projects and compare them to the available time you have to write to make sure they are attainable. Use those word and page counts, compare them to your writing speed and writing time, and make a projection about how long your project will take. That way you can check the Attainable variable in your SMART goal.
  • Make a timeline for your project. While you’re at it, lay out a timeline for your project so you know when you need to hit key milestones along the way, like chapters, mini-movies, act breaks, specific drafts, and submissions.
  • Plan in some padding or cushions for life to happen. It will. Allow yourself some flexibility. This doesn’t have to mean days off (though it can, I’m not a “don’t break the chain” tyrant) but it might mean having some leeway in what you’re aiming for.

How to set resolutions

And let’s talk about resolutions now.

As I’ve said, resolutions are often about decisions and hows, and can be incredibly useful when it comes to making bigger picture changes.

For example, you might make a resolution like this:

  • I will write every day.
  • I will treat my writing like a professional commitment.
  • I will schedule my writing and show up for it consistently.

A word about word and page count resolutions

You may notice that I’m not including examples like:

  • Write one page a day.
  • Write 1000 words a day.

There’s nothing wrong with these kinds of resolutions, per se.

What’s great is that they are reasonable and attainable resolutions for most of us.

But.

One of the big reasons we don’t focus ONLY on word or page counts in the Writer’s Circle is that they may not fit with the current stage of a project we are working on.

Word counts and page counts are terrific for writing Actual New Words. But when it comes to all of the other — and many — tasks associated with writing, it’s a measuring stick that falls short.

Think about it.

When you’re outlining, revising, editing, or polishing how do you measure word counts or page counts?

  • When we are revising and editing, we often cut words and even pages at a time.
  • Outlining isn’t necessarily a word-laden process but an important tool for writing within a solid structure.
  • Editing and polishing certainly don’t do much for word or page counts either.

And aren’t these all valid and critically important parts of the writing process? 

When you set a goal or resolution that’s focused on meeting a specific word count or page count each day, it implicitly negates ALL THE OTHER WORK you are doing or have to do and can leave you feeling like you haven’t met your commitment or that you have to scramble around writing new words or pages when that has nothing to do with the stage of the project you’re working on.

Not good.

What I recommend instead of word or page count only goals are time-based or time-and-count goals or resolutions, like this:

  • 30 minutes a day
  • One page per day or 30 minutes of revising, outlining, editing, polishing
  • 2000 words per day or 10 pages of editing or 60 minutes of revising, outlining, editing, polishing

The numbers themselves aren’t important here, but the principle of adaptability is.

As long as you use this method within the context of a Time-Bound SMART goal, you can stay handily on track with your progress, rather than feeling discouraged for not meeting a goal every day that doesn’t actually match with where you are in your process.

The bottom line? When you set resolutions that point to the hows, match them up with the specific stages of your writing projects so you stay inspired to keep on writing.

Onward to today’s writing prompts!

1. Where do you want to be at the end of 2015? What would you like to have finished and accomplished in your writing life? 

When you’re answering these two questions, go with your gut.

You can use the tips I’ve shared here about goal setting or just wax poetic for a few minutes. (We’ll get really specific about the HOW of all this tomorrow, anyway.)

I found myself writing out “I wants” as I worked with these last night.

From my notebook:

I want to focus on my own writing at my own pace.

I want to publish a simple writing habit ebook by the end of the year.

I want to write two new scripts by the end of the year.

 

2. How will that feel?

To help yourself anchor in the goal, think about how it will feel when you achieve it.

Here are responses from some of our Writer’s Circle members:

From Wendy, a Writer’s Circle member:

“By the end of ’15, I’d like to have The Endless Runway published – it needs editing; The Lost Witches established, and I hope I’ll have gained marketing experience. I will also write more books, the possibilities are endless! I’ll feel as if I’ve moved into a place I’ve always wanted to be.”

From Tracee, a Writer’s Circle coach:

“At the end of 2015, I plan to have written three more screenplays, including the rewrite drafts. My goal through the year will be to stay very organized and committed to my writing, keeping my writing time sacred and respecting that time as one of the most important things in my life. I think, along with feeling proud of myself for getting that much done, I will also feel like the professional I have become. It will be empowering to know that I can treat writing as more than just a hobby.”

From another Writer’s Circle member:

“I want to have my novel Skein completed and in the query stage, hopefully on the verge of being accepted. I’d like to also have my first novel of the Cherubim series on its way to completion. It will be scary. It will be terrifying. And I want to feel like I MUST do it anyway.”

From Helen, a Writer’s Circle member:

My goal for 2015 is to finish my dissertation and doctoral program.  I intend to continue my research by writing articles for scholarly journals.  Eventually, I plan to be a Subject Matter Expert in my areas of interest.”

From Sonya, a Writer’s Circle member:

At the end of 2015, I will have published my first eBookHealthy You. I will feel awesome because I will be making a difference in someone else’s life and shared what I have learned along the way.”

From Jo, a Writer’s Circle member:

“I want to continue to be gain validation about my writing from myself and not look outward for it. 

“I don’t like reading works that are safe and predictable, so why would I want to write them? So I will dive back into the novel that I started last year and really go for what I want it to be, mine the complexities of feelings and characters no matter how difficult and write the kind of book I want to read, trusting that others will feel the same way.

I will care less about being ‘a best seller’ and more about being finished and out there for whomever is looking for my voice.

“Truly claim the phrase ‘I am a writer.’

“I will be proud of myself. I will know that I set a goal and met it and that I did the best I could. And I will know that by acknowledging that I am a writer, I am acknowledging what I am and have always been in my deepest, most authentic core. As I was contemplating the answers to some of these questions, I felt a deep vibration inside – like my soul humming. Writing is what I am meant to do, it is what I need to do, it is what the universe needs me to do. Honouring writing in my own voice, I now know will have far-reaching and profound impact on my soul. It occurred to me that I could make all my fantasies come true through writing – creating characters, plots, resolving conflicts.”

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pen coffeeWriting prompts for Part six: Goals & Resolutions

Now it’s your turn! Here are your writing prompts for today. If you’re inspired to do so, please share your responses in the comments section on the blog (and feel free to leave questions for me too, if you have them).

Or, you can take them to your journal, talk them over with your writing colleagues, or just contemplate them when you can. You’re welcome to share any insights and Aha’s in the comments too.

  • Where do you want to be at the end of the year? What would you like to have finished and accomplished in your writing life?
  • How will that feel?

And don’t miss tomorrow’s post — the most important one in the series — about how to make this all actually HAPPEN.

 

An important reminder

Join the Writer's CircleBefore you head off to your journal, I have an important reminder about my Writer’s Circle small group coaching program.

Our rates are increasing in 2015, but we’re extending our 2014 rates for just a few more days so you can take advantage of them for the session that starts on Monday, January 5 AND lock them in for as long as you keep your subscription current, active, and continuous. When you enroll now, you’ll guarantee yourself the 2014 rate and save 30 to 50%, depending on the subscription package you choose.

The Writer’s Circle program is designed to help you show up, put your butt in your seat, WRITE, and see your projects all the way through to FINISHED. 

The next session starts this coming Monday. It’s the perfect time to create the support you really need to meet your writing goals for 2015 and make this your writing year to remember.

Registration closes on Friday, TOMORROW, January 2nd at Midnight Pacific Time.

Find out more and register online at www.JustDoTheWriting.com.