It’s the vibration, sweetie!

A long while ago, one of my lovely private clients asked me to write a post about food again. It’s been an even longer time since I’ve written anything about food, but the last time I did everyone ended up contributing all kinds of fabulous food ideas in the comments on the article. It was called “Eat your veggies, raise your vibration.”

Here are a few excerpts from that article:

“As sensitive souls, we are deeply affected by what we take in. This includes information, sensory input, the energy and emotions of other people, what we drink, and what we eat. How we might be affected negatively by what we eat is obvious when it comes to foods we have allergies too, foods that include chemicals (like MSG), or things like alcohol, sugar, highly processed foods, and caffeine, but we can be affected by food positively as well. In fact, what we eat makes a huge difference in our ability to function masterfully. This is because there is a vibration to everything we eat, and it affects our own personal vibration in turn.

“High-vibration foods carry a natural, positive, uplifting energy. You can feel it when you eat them. They are fresh, whole, natural, organic, “sunlight” foods, grown with sustainable, clean farming practices. Vegetables and fruits in particular are naturally high-vibration foods.”

Eating high-vibration foods

Here are my tricks for HOW I check the vibration of what I’m eating.

#1 Color

When we make our son’s lunch or prepare our family’s dinner plates, I look at the array of colors.

If I see a full spectrum of colors — and always something green — I know I’m on the right track. I feel nervous when I see a “brown dinner” on my plate, because I’ve learned that afterward I’ll feel flat and ugh-y.

So even if my plate is filled with yummy broiled organic chicken, roasted organic cauliflower, and organic gluten-free pasta, I’m not comfortable until I’ve added sliced red bell peppers, a green salad, some broccoli, green peas, or even some fresh strawberries. Mostly likely at least three of those.

Other colorful items I love to see on my plate: dark greens like kale and chard (especially when they’re “dressed up” with a special dressing or nuts) and broccoli; vibrant orange sweet potatoes, carrots, persimmons, and oranges; lighter greens like peas, zucchini, asparagus, lettuces, Brussels sprouts; and reds like red bells, strawberries, and beets.

Ideally I like to see at least two to three other colors besides brown on my plate.

#2 Freshness

On top of that, I like to make sure I have something very fresh — like barely steamed broccoli or snap peas that are still deliciously crunchy, fresh strawberries, red bell peppers, etc. served with whatever we’re eating. It doesn’t always happen (we’re busy people with a small child), but we do our best. We shop weekly and really put the focus on the vegetables when we do, so that there’s always something quick to steam, chop, or pan cook.

#3 Origin, Quality, & Care

Where our food comes from and the quality and care that’s put into the farming of it makes a difference too.

We’ve started getting a produce box from a nearby farm, and I love the adventure of it — figuring out what to do with all the odd vegetables that arrive (which is often roasted a chicken in a pan strewn with a veggie medley).

The deliciousness of the carrots from that box far surpasses anything I can buy in the store. And that is hugely motivating when it comes to eating well.

#4 Heaviness

I also like to look at the weight or heaviness of what I’m eating. If I eat a bunch of carbs (pasta, potatoes, breads, etc), I’m tired, sluggish, and less effective afterward.

I’ve given up gluten except rarely, and I generally just try to avoid grains and breads as a result. But I do find that if I really want something more substantial, I’m better off with lentils or beans than other “whiter” carbs. Then I have some substance without being dragged down by it afterward.

#5 Protein

I also make a point to prioritize protein. As a sensitive person easily affected by blood sugar swings, I’m much more stable and focused when I regularly consume protein. I lean toward organic when I can get it, plus free range or “pastured” poultry and meats if I can. (If you’re a vegetarian, this can be trickier, but I do like organic non-GMO tofu on occasion).

Again, I believe the quality of the source does affect us, but consuming protein for me also has a direct effect on MY vibration. If I junk food or lots of carb-focused foods, I just feel weighted down and heavy. If I focus on protein and veggies, I feel lighter and clearer headed.

Why this matters for sensitives and writers — and sensitive writers

Part of being able to write and create on a regular basis is functioning well. If we’re not taking good care of ourselves, our “creative well” gets depleted. Paying attention to our own energy as well as the energy of the food we eat makes a huge difference in our physical well-being, which in turn affects our ability to create and be our best selves in the world. What we eat matters.

Your turn

How are you eating these days? What tricks and tips do you have for eating well? Share them in the comments below.

Warmly,

 Jenna

p.s. If you are on the sensitive side of the spectrum, you may also be interested in my Energy Skills classes for sensitive souls. You can check them out here: https://calledtowrite.com/shop, but don’t buy them now, because they’ll be on sale next week!

 

Coming Attractions

~> Next week. Special Spring Sale on my energy skills classes. Stay tuned for details coming soon.

~> Thursday, May 16th. Register by May 16th for the next session of my Writer’s Circle (starts May 20th). Build a solid habit of daily writing and finish all your writing projects: http://JustDoTheWriting.com.

 

What I'm Up To

~> Writing. Progeny, my sci-fi action script with a spiritual twist, is done! At least for this round. :) I’ve just submitted it to my mentor and once he sends me notes back, I’ll be submitting it to a contest. I’m just thrilled to have reached this major milestone and I’m planning a day off to play hooky from everything in the very near future to celebrate.

~> Unplugging. Friday sundown to Saturday sundown. Join me!

~> Reading. Reading A Boy and His Bot* by Daniel H. Wilson with my son. Still read The Empath and the Archetypal Drama Triangle* by Elaine La Joie (also a good friend and colleague). I’ll get back to Adventures in the Screen Trade* by William Goldman eventually. :) I’m all caught up on Game Of Thrones now, it’s just terrific.

 

Thanks for reading.

* Affiliate link

Comments

  1. hi Jenna
    I’ve cut out carbs and added good fats / oils. Feeling much better. Noticed my chakras have opened up and much more aware of my feelings. Realise I had been using carbs to dampen the painful energy. Looking for better ways to manage it.

    • Jenna says:

      Hi Pamela, great points, thanks for mentioning the carbs for dampening. I think many of us do that. Good fats and oils make a big difference for me too!

  2. Mary says:

    Being such a sensitive person yourself, I am really surprised that you eat meat.
    Being sensitive means you are also sensitive to your surroundings and the feelings and well-being of animals.
    My motto is not to eat anything with a face.
    Good words to live by, in my opinion.
    Thank you.

    • Jenna says:

      Hi Mary, Yes, for some sensitive people that’s a really important consideration. I’ve found that I personally don’t do well without it.

      It’s can be source of debate amongst HSPs as Elaine Aron mentioned in her newsletter recently: “For years I have avoided discussing in Comfort Zone anything that could be seen as controversial … I try to avoid the usual forbidden topics: politics, religion (but I can’t ignore spirituality), and I add diet. (The only time I had to break up an argument among HSPs was when one person said she couldn’t imagine an HSP eating “the flesh of animals,” and another became furious, saying meat was essential for her health, and probably everyone’s.)

      It’s a tricky issue, and one we each have to resolve for ourselves.

      What’s your solution when it comes to protein? I’d be interested to hear.

  3. As someone with food allergies ranging from potentially fatal (all pork products, even something cooked in bacon grease) to relatively mild (hives after eating a lot of strawberries) I’ve thrown out all ‘rules’ for food except: Anything ‘diet’ is incredibly bad for you, fat free is even worse and carbonated soda is for when your stomach is upset. Forget salads, lettuce shreds my stomach.

    When I no longer had to look after my mom I realized I’d only been eating twice a day (I don’t know for how long.) My energy was depleted. I found a french vanilla protein bar at a local health food store that didn’t trigger the allergies. (I still eat beef, chicken, fish and eggs.)

    I also added a fruit and vegetable drink disguised as mango. I’m eating four small meals a day and I’ve lost a pant size. Plus I’m almost up to normal energy. It took two months before the grief quit fogging my brain but I’m back at full steam for writing.

    • Jenna says:

      Yeah, anything “diet” is tough for me too. That’s so interesting about pork being an allergen for you, I’ve never heard about that before. And lettuce too! Interesting. There are so many variations for each of us to take into consideration. (I avoid gluten, cooked tomato sauces, MSG, aspartame, shellfish, and zinfandel, all for varying reasons.)

      Sounds like you’re doing a great job bringing your energy back up. Grief is a process, I love seeing how you’re taking care of yourself through it all. Blessings to you.

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