Get Clear on Your Characters with GMC (Plus a Free Character Profile Template!)

Something I tackled in my most recent screenwriting assignment was getting clear on who the characters are and what motivates them, especially since they weren't my original characters. This project was a rewrite of a writer-producer's script so the characters were his, though they now feel like "ours."

Part of the process of getting there was working through the characters' GMC (goals, motivation, and conflict) to understand them more deeply.

Cathy Yardley first introduced me to GMC. I've done some plot work with her on other projects, and loved her book series where she describes the concept of GMC. The book series is offered collectively in print as Rock Your Writing, also available in a six-part Kindle series, including Rock Your Plot and Rock Your Revisions. She recommends another book called GMC: Goal, Motivation, and Conflict, The Building Blocks of Good Fiction that I found helpful as well. (Amazon links for all of these books are in the References section, below.)

What I find most useful about GMC is that it gives me a way into my character's head.

The jury is still out on whether or not I'm more of an intuitive writer (one who excels in character and dialogue but has a hard time with plot and structure) or a conceptual writer (one who does well with plot and structure but struggles with the character and dialogue). So far, my take is that I'm more of a conceptual writer.

In any case, it helps me to have a character profile for each character I'm working with, and adding GMC to my character profiles has been exceedingly helpful, so I'm sharing it with you. (This would be a useful tool for creative non-fiction writers too!)

Note: If you're interested in seeing my entire character profile template, you can download a copy of it at the end of this post. 

How GMC Works

We break goals, motivation, and conflict down into both external and internal GMC. This helps us understand both what's driving the character externally and internally. This syncs up nicely with Shawn Coyne's External Content Genre and his Internal Content Genre, though they are different tools (I'll write about this more in a future post -- The Story Grid* methodology has completely rewired my brain for story in an incredibly useful way).

Here's an explanation of External and Internal GMC.

External GMC

  • The character's EXTERNAL GOAL is the WHAT they are trying to achieve or accomplish by the story's end. This cannot be vague in any way. Cathy Yardley once told me that an external goal has to be something that you can easily check off in a box when it's done. For example, disable the bomb, check. Or, catch the bad guy, check. It can't be something like "get my mom to approve of me," because it can be too unclear about whether or not that has actually occurred (although I suppose it could be verbally said, "I approve of you" but there's still room for interpretation -- does she actually mean it, etc.).
  • The character's EXTERNAL MOTIVATION is WHY they are trying to achieve that goal. What reason do they have for trying to reach their goal? What's at stake, what are the consequences if they don't make whatever it is happen? That's their why. For example, everyone in the building will die (if the protag doesn't disable the bomb). Or, the bad guy may kill again. This can be considered the "Because" clause.
  • The character's EXTERNAL CONFLICT is the OPPOSITION to achieving the goal. What or who gets in the way? Usually this is the antagonist but it could also be the establishment, the environment, etc., if it's a human against the state or human against the world kind of story. This could also be considered the "But" clause if you think of these as a sentence.

For example: Carly wants to disable the bomb because otherwise hundreds of people will die, but the antagonist has hidden the bomb and is taunting Carly with killing people one by one as clues until she finds it. 

Internal GMC

  • The character's INTERNAL GOAL is about HOW the character is trying to feel or hoping to feel. It may or may not be tied to the external goal. And it probably isn't something that can be ticked off in a check box. It's more of a feeling state, such as happiness or independence, or vengeance. It can also be a spiritual goal. The internal and external goals CAN be in alignment but they can also not match up -- which can create excellent internal conflict for your character. (Don't forget, we want them to suffer -- our readers and viewers want to worry about our characters, that's why they're there!)
  • The character's INTERNAL MOTIVATION is WHY they want to feel that way. Often this is tied to their backstory, or personal goals outside the story. The internal motivation is the emotion that drives the character. For example, a character may have been overly controlled for her entire life by her parents, so she's trying to create an independent life for herself.
  • The character's INTERNAL CONFLICT is WHAT might be stopping her from reaching that state of being. This could be caused by the character themselves, but it can also be tied to the external GMC and cause problems for in achieving it. With our example, our character might suffer from insecurity, and keep turning back to her parents for help.

I like to put these together in a chart, like the one below (spreadsheets are handy here), though I also just make bullet point lists when I'm writing in Scrivener since it doesn't play that well with tables.

Here's an example:

  External Internal
Goal Carly's external goal is to disable the bomb... Carly's internal goal is to forge out on her own...
Motivation Because otherwise hundreds of people will die... Because her psychologist parents have been holding her back for years with their oppressive personalities...
Conflict But the antagonist has hidden the bomb and is taunting Carly with killing people one by one as clues until she finds it.  But she struggles with insecurity so keeps turning to her parents for support and encouragement, and even worse, now needs their help her track down the bomber.

 

It's useful to see how the internal and external can work together here. 

I often rework these multiple times until I feel that I've landed on something that works. And then I'll often rework it again, once I've finished a script, because I tend to pick up more nuance and information as I interact with the character over the course of the story.

It's an ever-evolving process.

Want to Check Out My Character Profile Template?

It includes the GMC points I outlined above along with a handful of other useful and streamlined items I assemble for each character. It comes in a PDF and RTF format, along with a Quick Start Guide. You can import the RTF into Word or Scrivener for easy customization and editing.

Click the image below to download it now.

Let me know what you think in the comments!  

 

References

* All book links are Amazon affiliate links:

 

The Power of the Enneagram

I've been a follower of the Enneagram since 1998. The Enneagram is a powerful system that is highly useful for understanding your personality and inner motivations.

My work colleague told me about it one day, and mentioned that she was pretty sure I was a "Six" just like she was. Horrified to be lumped into a category with someone I often struggled to get along with, I quickly set out to prove that I WASN'T A SIX! I didn't care what it actually was, I just didn't want to be THAT.

I took a few tests online and found that the results were mixed. In some I WAS a Six. The horror! In others, it came back as a Four. Hmm. (The tests can be a great place to start if you're curious about this.)

My colleague suggested that the best way to "get" the Enneagram was to attend a panel discussion, where I could watch and hear from groups of particular types. I think over the years I've now attended two different Enneagram panel series and one other Enneagram class here in the local San Francisco Bay Area.

But what I vividly remember is watching the panel of Fours in the first series I attended. I was already suspecting I was a Four -- the Individualist, the Dreamer, the Romantic, the Tragic Romantic, the Artist -- and I was determined to find out once and for all. (The names vary depending on whose book you're reading, and some people don't even like to use the names at all because of the projections people make onto them.)

Fours are known for wanting to be different and special. Unique. It's both a source of pain and pride for them.

At that first panel series, I watched the entire row of Fours talk about their experiences being a Four. We got all the way down to the very end of the line (there must have been 12 to 14 people easily), and the last woman said, "I don't know, I just don't really identify with everyone else here. I mean, I know I'm a Four, and I know you all are too, but I just feel different."

Right then, I knew in my core, as she expressed EXACTLY WHAT I WAS THINKING, that I was, in fact, a Four.

It wasn't exactly a thrilling revelation, though it certainly did alleviate my other drama about my colleague (Fours seem to, ahem, like, create, and attract drama). Mostly it hit me: "Oh man, you mean all that stuff that Fours are? I'm that too??"

personality-typesMost of the Enneagram books out there tend to look at each of the nine types from a fairly negative perspective, and a lot of people can be overwhelmed by that. I quickly learned that most of Helen Palmer's books were too dark for me, and found Personality Types: Using the Enneagram for Self-Discovery* by Don Richard Riso with Russ Hudson. I loved the levels of integration and disintegration they described because it gave me a sense that there was hope for improvement and it helped me learn a ton about myself and my suddenly transparent behavior and fixations.

So fast-forward a few years.

Over time, the Enneagram has been a great tool for me for both understanding and getting along with my Nine husband (a Peacemaker) and helping my clients understand themselves better (of course many of them tend to be Fours :) ). One of my colleagues has written a series of books for empaths based around the core Enneagram principles* that I highly recommend. I've written a few articles related to the Enneagram myself, and have a page on my old website about the Enneagram and how it relates to high sensitivity.

And once I started writing fiction, I turned to the Enneagram to use it to develop my characters. But I thought of it as simply that, a tool to help me develop each character individually.

I never really thought of it as anything more, or how the characters might be related to each other through the Enneagram.

Then last October, I was following one of my fellow ScriptMag columnists online, Jeff Lyons, who tweeted something about a class he was offering and I discovered that he also offered writing-related, "rapid story development" Enneagram classes and I was enthralled! I wanted to know more right away. It didn't take long for us to talk about him coming here to Berkeley to teach his method.

What amazes me most about it is that he uses a combination of story premise and the archetypal Enneagram system to do story structure work. Not just character, not just motivation, not even just how characters are related. He works with his own proprietary story premise model with the Enneagram to tackle character, plot, and structure in a holistic, integrated fashion.

Who knew!?

I can't wait to see how he does it, and I hope you'll consider coming to join us too. He's going to be teaching the Enneagram in a very hands-on fashion -- it sounds like perfect hybrid of observation, teaching, taking action, and getting a chance to put it into practice. He's even going to do some 1:1 "magic time" with a few lucky participants on their own story structure and premise. It's going to be amazing.

If you can't come and be there live, or if you want more information, we'd love to have you join us over the next three weeks for a three-part interview series with Jeff so you can get a sense of this ground-breaking tool. You can find out more about the teleclass series and register here.

Your turn

Are you familiar with the Enneagram? What has it helped you shift or change in your own life? If you're a writer, do you use it in your writing? I'd love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

Warmly,

 Jenna

 

You may also be interested in: