Ask the Coach: When Should I Give Up On a Script? – On Script Mag

Welcome to the next installment of my “Ask the Coach” column on Script Mag!
 
This month’s question is specifically about finishing, and when — or if — to give up on a project:
 
“How can I deal with the indecision that comes with looking at what I’m writing and reaching a point at which I say, “I never should have started this in the first place — no one will care about this, this is unoriginal, this has no chance of selling, what was I thinking?” I don’t see a point at continuing and then go on to the next potentially shiny object. Very frustrating and totally within my control. What do you recommend?”
 
Great question! In order to help you answer it, I have some questions for you.

 

“The first thing to consider is whether or not this inner voice speaking up is the voice of resistance, or the voice of intuition.”

 
For my four questions to consider and my full answer,
read the article on Script Mag here:
Ask the Coach: When Should I Give Up On a Script?
 

 

If you’ve got writing questions, please send them my way!
I’d love to answer them for you in my column.

 

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay 

Ask the Coach: Not Three-Act Enough? – On Script Mag

Welcome to the first installment of my new “Ask the Coach” column on Script Mag!
 
This month’s question is specifically about the three-act structure in screenwriting:
 
“What I’m running into is the common criticism that my stories are not strongly three-act. They have a beginning setup, mounting problem, and ending resolution — good stories, I’m told — but tension doesn’t build in common cinematic form. Yet, I watch produced movies even less three-act structured. What am I missing?”
 
As your coach-of-the-moment, here’s how I’ll approach this question with you. Let’s look at the core components inherent in the question: how films get made (to address your comment about the produced movies), the source of the feedback, the value and strength of the three-act structure overall, and the impact of your own work.
 
“Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.”
— Neil Gaiman
For my full answer on three-act structure, how to look for a note beneath a note, and digging deeper into improving your next draft
read the article on Script Mag here:
Ask the Coach: Not Three-Act Enough?
 
 
Image by Lukas Bieri from Pixabay 

 

 

 

Ask the Coach: Your Writing Questions, Answered – On Script Mag

My new “Ask the Coach” column on Script Mag launched this week!

As a writing coach, I answer a lot of questions for writers about how to make the work of writing actually happen. As you may already know, I specialize in helping writers get out of their own way and back on track with what they were put here to do.

In this monthly column, I’ll be answering your questions, anonymously, about navigating the ups and downs of writing, being a writer, and living a writer’s life, specific to your unique circumstances.

This is a judgment-free, guilt-free zone. It doesn’t matter what you have or haven’t done, so far.

What matters is what comes next. Ask me your most pressing questions, and my goal will be to help find a solution that works for you.

For a sampling of topics writers often ask about and to submit your own question
read the article on Script Mag here: 
Ask the Coach: Your Writing Questions, Answered

 

 Photo by Olya Kobruseva from Pexels